My Daily Prompt Blog

Where I do my Daily Prompts


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Just when life seems crazy…It gets crazier


So my rash cleared up thanks to a shot and 14 days of antibiotic.  Within a few days it was back and stronger yet.
Luckily I had a scheduled follow up visit with the doctor any ways so I dragged my body in there yesterday.
Trust me, I would have rather have stayed in bed.  Every joint in my body aches.  The change in weather has not helped.

Our visit was quite interesting as she sat and listened and saw the rash again, noticed that I still had difficulty breathing.
We discussed the blood test that had been drawn for my pre allergy test.  I found it odd that it suddenly showed that I was
now allergic to beef, pork and milk…on a severe level.  As she put it guess what they are fed…corn…so she felt that it was
not odd at all.

I am now in the process of being tested for a problem called Alpha Gal.
According to http://alpha-gal.org/  :

LoneStarPair

Lone Star Tick

Galactose-alpha-1,3-galactose, or Alpha-Gal for short, is a delayed allergy to mammal meat affecting a growing number of the population. This allergy is initially caused by a tick bite. Since the reaction to eating mammal meat is delayed by several hours, the proper diagnosis is often missed or misdiagnosed. People who are afflicted with the Alpha-Gal allergy have to be constantly vigilant about the ingredients they consume, because an allergic reaction can be severe and life-threatening.
By getting the attention of the food service industry, particularly in schools, colleges and universities, and restaurants, sufferers will get relief.  Adding beef broth to soup and calling it vegetable soup or adding bacon drippings to gravy can be life-threatening to people with the Alpha-Gal allergy. By including Alpha-Gal allergy information on menus or even more specifically, having ingredient lists available upon request, the constant worry will be eliminated from eating out.

Empower.

AGAA will strive to empower those with this allergy. Living with the Alpha-Gal allergy can be quite stressful, because many activities are planned around food, and it is often almost impossible to know the ingredients in many dishes. This problem can render a simple meal into an anxiety-provoking situation for people with the allergy, because they are very aware of the possibility they could be unknowingly ingesting food that contains an undisclosed allergen. By getting attention for this allergy, it is AGAA’s hope that those affected will be better able to cope with this allergy, due to others’ increased awareness and subsequent conscientiousness regarding food preparation.

Mission Statement

Enlighten. Empower. Eradicate.

The mission of Alpha-Gal Allergy Awareness team is to promote health and ultimately, save the lives of those afflicted with the Alpha-Gal allergy through increased allergy awareness.

Awareness Disclaimer

The materials and information on this page, along with any articles or other links, are for informational and educational purposes, intended to promote awareness and are not, nor intended to constitute or replace, medical or other health science advice or treatment. Alpha-Gal Allergy wareness strives for the information on the page to be accurate, but much of the information is opinion of others, including information contained in articles, so AGAA disclaims any warranty of any kind, whether express or implied, as to any matter whatsoever relating to this site.  In no event shall AGAA be liable for any indirect, special, incidental, general or consequential damages arising out of any use of or reliance on any content of this website. This is strictly an awareness site and no connection to the medical field is present.

I am now on an antibiotic for the next fourteen days and I had to get another shot.  Now I have to go for a series of blood tests and see an allergist.

Perhaps after this I will begin to feel a little better and my body will begin to stop aching.  Guess I will never be able to enjoy red meat or pork or dairy again.

There goes my bacon cheeseburgers.  Needless to say I have a big pot of homemade chicken noodle soup cooking.  My biggest fear is what did they feed the chicken.

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Interesting Book I Am Reading


During Sunday School Class, the topic of a book came up that sounded very intriging.

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Case for Christ/Case for Faith Compilation [Kindle Edition]

Lee Strobel

Image of Lee Strobel

Lee Strobel (www.LeeStrobel.com), with a journalism degree from the University of Missouri and a Master of Studies in Law degree from Yale Law School, was the award-winning legal editor of the Chicago Tribune and a spiritual skeptic until 1981. His books include four Gold Medallion winners and the 2005 Christian Book of the Year (coauthored with Garry Poole). He and his wife live in Colorado.

First of all to find out that he was an atheist when he first began was a surprise to me.  He only began to investigate due to his wife becoming a Christian.  His book has become a movie if you are not patient enough to read a book so look to see if it is available in DVD in your area.

Sorry I am not giving away about the book….read it for yourself and I will say that you will be glad that you did.  Just do not expect to get much done around the house as it is one of those can’t put it down books once you start to read it.

Tammye Honey


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Writing 101: Day 2 Where would I go today?


writing-101-june-2014-class-badge-2

 

Sometimes we read things on others Facebook posts that were not necessarily meant for us but the point is taken anyways.
Today was one of those days as I glanced upon my wall and saw a post about Motherless by Choice.  It hit a nerve with me and hurt.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/katie-naum/motherless-by-choice_b_5417281.html?ncid=fcbklnkushpmg00000046

If I could be anywhere today just for a fleeting moment in time it would be to sit next to both of my daughters just for a few minutes of their busy lives.
To be able to give them a hug, a big kiss and tell them that I truly do love them.  How proud I am of them and their success in life.

I know that there are scars in the past life and that they hold them tight.  My heart aches over this and you can’t go back and erase time or get a redo.

Life is a learning curve.  We learn from our mistakes.  We get stronger as we get older and we learn what not to do again.

I have asked forgiveness and was not allowed to have it.  From that one must go one with life.  It does not help the pain.

As I sit here and shed tears it does no good.  I realize this.  Only a head ache will occur.

Just a few minutes to hug my grand children would feel so good.  I am not getting any younger and I know that my health is not getting any better either.
These past few years have really taken a toll on me and as I reflect back it is useless to comprehend on what could have been different.  It can’t change now.

Little do they know that my heart is always with them and that my thoughts follow them through their journey of life.  Even if it is only on Facebook or an occasional text.

Perhaps some day things will be different.  I pray every night that God will soften the pain for all three of us.

 


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Home Based Business & A Roadside Stand


Home Based Business & A Roadside Stand.

via Home Based Business & A Roadside Stand.


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About My Hubby’s New Blog Site


About.

via About.

My hubby has started to blog so let’s give him a big shout out and say hello.  He is new and just learning but is catching on quickly and is enjoying the blog world.

Stop in and say hello please.


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Findings Along The Way Part II


It is been a week and still no word on the bloodwork.  It is back, it just has not been read yet.
The test we are specifically waiting for is a PSA test.  http://www.mayoclinic.org/tests-procedures/psa-test/basics/definition/prc-20013324

The PSA test is used primarily to screen for prostate cancer. A PSA test measures the amount of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) in your blood. PSA is a protein produced in the prostate, a small gland that sits below a man’s bladder. PSA is mostly found in semen, which also is produced in the prostate. Small amounts of PSA ordinarily circulate in the blood.

The PSA test can detect high levels of PSA that may indicate the presence of prostate cancer. However, many other conditions, such as an enlarged or inflamed prostate, can also increase PSA levels.

There is a lot of conflicting advice about PSA testing. Ultimately, whether you have a PSA test is something you should decide after discussing it with your doctor, considering your risk factors and weighing your personal preferences.

Results of PSA tests are reported as nanograms of PSA per milliliter of blood (ng/mL). There’s no specific cutoff point between a normal and abnormal PSA level. Your doctor might recommend a prostate biopsy based on results of your PSA test and digital rectal exam, along with other factors.

Variations of the PSA test

Your doctor may use other ways of interpreting PSA results before making decisions about ordering a biopsy to test for cancerous tissue. These other methods are intended to improve the accuracy of the PSA test as a screening tool.

Researchers continue to investigate variations of the PSA test to determine whether they provide a measurable benefit. Variations of the PSA test include:

  • PSA velocity. PSA velocity is the change in PSA levels over time. A rapid rise in PSA may indicate the presence of cancer or an aggressive form of cancer.
  • Percentage of free PSA. PSA circulates in the blood in two forms — either attached to certain blood proteins or unattached (free). If you have a high PSA level but a low percentage of free PSA, it may be more likely that you have prostate cancer. This test is primarily used for men with a PSA level in the borderline range between 4 and 10. It is especially useful when determining the need for re-biopsy rather than in an initial screening state.

Talk to your doctor

Before getting a PSA test, talk to your doctor about the benefits and risks. If you decide that a PSA test is right for you, ask your doctor:

  • When you will discuss the results
  • What kinds of recommendations he or she might make if the results are positive
  • How often you should repeat the test if the results are negative

Discussing these issues beforehand may make it easier for you to learn the results of your test and make appropriate decisions afterward.

Prostate cancer is the most common nonskin cancer in men, and it’s the second leading cause of cancer-related death in men after lung cancer. Early detection may be an important tool in getting appropriate and timely treatment.

Men with prostate cancer may have elevated levels of PSA. Many noncancerous conditions also can increase a man’s PSA level. Although the PSA test can detect high levels of PSA in the blood, the test doesn’t provide precise diagnostic information about the condition of the prostate.

The PSA test is only one tool used to screen for early signs of prostate cancer. Another common screening test, usually done in addition to a PSA test, is a digital rectal exam. In this test, your doctor inserts a lubricated, gloved finger into your rectum to reach the prostate. By feeling or pressing on the prostate, the doctor may be able to judge whether it has abnormal lumps or hard areas.

Neither the PSA test nor the digital rectal exam provides enough information for your doctor to diagnose prostate cancer. Abnormal results in these tests may lead your doctor to recommend a prostate biopsy. During this procedure, samples of tissue are removed for laboratory examination. A diagnosis of cancer is based on the biopsy results.

Other reasons for PSA tests

For men who have already been diagnosed with prostate cancer, the PSA test may be used to:

  • Help decide if and when to begin treatment
  • Judge the effectiveness of a treatment
  • Check for recurring cancer

Benefits of the test

A PSA test may help detect prostate cancer at an early stage.  Cancer is easier to treat and is more likely to be cured if it’s diagnosed in its early stages.

But to judge the benefit of the test, it’s important to know if early detection and early treatment will improve treatment outcomes and decrease the number of deaths from prostate cancer.

A key issue is the typical course of prostate cancer. Prostate cancer usually progresses slowly over many years. Therefore, a man may have prostate cancer that never causes symptoms or becomes a medical problem during his lifetime.

Limitations of the test

The limitations of PSA testing include:

  • PSA-raising factors. Besides cancer, other conditions that can raise PSA levels include an enlarged prostate (benign prostatic hyperplasia, or BPH) and an inflamed or infected prostate (prostatitis). Also, PSA levels normally increase with age.
  • PSA-lowering factors. Certain drugs used to treat BPH or urinary conditions may lower PSA levels. Large doses of certain chemotherapy medications can also lower PSA levels.
  • Misleading results. The test doesn’t always provide an accurate result. An elevated PSA level doesn’t necessarily mean you have cancer. And in some cases, a normal PSA level does not completely rule out prostate cancer.
  • Overdiagnosis. Studies have estimated that between 17 and 50 percent of men with prostate cancer detected by PSA tests have tumors that wouldn’t result in symptoms during their lifetimes. These symptom-free tumors are considered overdiagnoses — identification of cancer not likely to cause poor health or to present a risk to the man’s life.

A number of major professional organizations and government agencies have weighed in on the benefits and risks of PSA testing. The American Cancer Society, the American Urological Association, the American College of Preventive Medicine, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force all recognize the controversy surrounding screening with the PSA test and the lack of firm evidence that screening can prevent deaths from prostate cancer. Other points of agreement include:

  • Screening needs to be an individualized decision. All of the organizations recommend that doctors discuss the benefits and risks of PSA testing with men at a certain age or in high-risk groups. Doctors should help men make their own decisions about screening, based on age, risk factors, life expectancy and personal preferences.
  • Older men may not need to be screened. Some organizations recommend that screening isn’t necessary for men age 75 and older or those who aren’t expected to live more than 10 years. The American Cancer Society advises that this decision should be made on an individual basis. It is very important, however, to keep in mind that decisions need to be individualized and not assume that all prostate cancer screening must stop once a man is in his 70s.
  • Men at high risk should discuss screening at an earlier age. Some groups recommend earlier discussions for men in high-risk groups — those with a family history of prostate cancer and African-American men.

The American Cancer Society recommends that doctors provide information about prostate cancer screening to men at average risk starting at age 50, while men at higher risk could benefit from this information at age 40 or 45. The American Urological Association recommends that men consider getting a baseline prostate cancer screening, including a PSA test and DRE, beginning at age 40.

The American Urological Association (AUA) recommends against PSA screening in men under age 40, and it doesn’t recommend screening between ages 40 and 54 for men at average risk. For men ages 55 to 69, the AUA recommends shared decision-making between men and their doctors about when to begin screening. The AUA guidelines state that the greatest benefit of screening appears to be in men ages 55 to 69, and it does not recommend routine screening beyond age 70.

The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommends against PSA-based screening for men who do not have symptoms that are highly suspicious for prostate cancer. The USPSTF states that PSA testing in healthy men, regardless of age, offers no net benefit or that the harms outweigh the benefits. This has been a very controversial point of view, and many experts in the field of prostate cancer do not agree with the USPSTF recommendations.

http://www.vanderbilthealth.com/urology/42014

We went with just the blood work for the findings rather than the full biopsy.  While they were screening for this they also ran a screen for pancretic, liver and kidney.

By doing just the bloodwork first it is less evasive and the patient really does not have quite the anxiety that they do with the biopsy.

Hope this was informative.

Part three will be next week of the Melanoma treatment in Nashville and Vanderbilt Hospital. http://www.vanderbilthealth.com/main/maps

Till then eat healthy and appreciate your loved ones.

Tammye Honey