My Daily Prompt Blog

Where I do my Daily Prompts


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Findings Along The Way Part II


It is been a week and still no word on the bloodwork.  It is back, it just has not been read yet.
The test we are specifically waiting for is a PSA test.  http://www.mayoclinic.org/tests-procedures/psa-test/basics/definition/prc-20013324

The PSA test is used primarily to screen for prostate cancer. A PSA test measures the amount of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) in your blood. PSA is a protein produced in the prostate, a small gland that sits below a man’s bladder. PSA is mostly found in semen, which also is produced in the prostate. Small amounts of PSA ordinarily circulate in the blood.

The PSA test can detect high levels of PSA that may indicate the presence of prostate cancer. However, many other conditions, such as an enlarged or inflamed prostate, can also increase PSA levels.

There is a lot of conflicting advice about PSA testing. Ultimately, whether you have a PSA test is something you should decide after discussing it with your doctor, considering your risk factors and weighing your personal preferences.

Results of PSA tests are reported as nanograms of PSA per milliliter of blood (ng/mL). There’s no specific cutoff point between a normal and abnormal PSA level. Your doctor might recommend a prostate biopsy based on results of your PSA test and digital rectal exam, along with other factors.

Variations of the PSA test

Your doctor may use other ways of interpreting PSA results before making decisions about ordering a biopsy to test for cancerous tissue. These other methods are intended to improve the accuracy of the PSA test as a screening tool.

Researchers continue to investigate variations of the PSA test to determine whether they provide a measurable benefit. Variations of the PSA test include:

  • PSA velocity. PSA velocity is the change in PSA levels over time. A rapid rise in PSA may indicate the presence of cancer or an aggressive form of cancer.
  • Percentage of free PSA. PSA circulates in the blood in two forms — either attached to certain blood proteins or unattached (free). If you have a high PSA level but a low percentage of free PSA, it may be more likely that you have prostate cancer. This test is primarily used for men with a PSA level in the borderline range between 4 and 10. It is especially useful when determining the need for re-biopsy rather than in an initial screening state.

Talk to your doctor

Before getting a PSA test, talk to your doctor about the benefits and risks. If you decide that a PSA test is right for you, ask your doctor:

  • When you will discuss the results
  • What kinds of recommendations he or she might make if the results are positive
  • How often you should repeat the test if the results are negative

Discussing these issues beforehand may make it easier for you to learn the results of your test and make appropriate decisions afterward.

Prostate cancer is the most common nonskin cancer in men, and it’s the second leading cause of cancer-related death in men after lung cancer. Early detection may be an important tool in getting appropriate and timely treatment.

Men with prostate cancer may have elevated levels of PSA. Many noncancerous conditions also can increase a man’s PSA level. Although the PSA test can detect high levels of PSA in the blood, the test doesn’t provide precise diagnostic information about the condition of the prostate.

The PSA test is only one tool used to screen for early signs of prostate cancer. Another common screening test, usually done in addition to a PSA test, is a digital rectal exam. In this test, your doctor inserts a lubricated, gloved finger into your rectum to reach the prostate. By feeling or pressing on the prostate, the doctor may be able to judge whether it has abnormal lumps or hard areas.

Neither the PSA test nor the digital rectal exam provides enough information for your doctor to diagnose prostate cancer. Abnormal results in these tests may lead your doctor to recommend a prostate biopsy. During this procedure, samples of tissue are removed for laboratory examination. A diagnosis of cancer is based on the biopsy results.

Other reasons for PSA tests

For men who have already been diagnosed with prostate cancer, the PSA test may be used to:

  • Help decide if and when to begin treatment
  • Judge the effectiveness of a treatment
  • Check for recurring cancer

Benefits of the test

A PSA test may help detect prostate cancer at an early stage.  Cancer is easier to treat and is more likely to be cured if it’s diagnosed in its early stages.

But to judge the benefit of the test, it’s important to know if early detection and early treatment will improve treatment outcomes and decrease the number of deaths from prostate cancer.

A key issue is the typical course of prostate cancer. Prostate cancer usually progresses slowly over many years. Therefore, a man may have prostate cancer that never causes symptoms or becomes a medical problem during his lifetime.

Limitations of the test

The limitations of PSA testing include:

  • PSA-raising factors. Besides cancer, other conditions that can raise PSA levels include an enlarged prostate (benign prostatic hyperplasia, or BPH) and an inflamed or infected prostate (prostatitis). Also, PSA levels normally increase with age.
  • PSA-lowering factors. Certain drugs used to treat BPH or urinary conditions may lower PSA levels. Large doses of certain chemotherapy medications can also lower PSA levels.
  • Misleading results. The test doesn’t always provide an accurate result. An elevated PSA level doesn’t necessarily mean you have cancer. And in some cases, a normal PSA level does not completely rule out prostate cancer.
  • Overdiagnosis. Studies have estimated that between 17 and 50 percent of men with prostate cancer detected by PSA tests have tumors that wouldn’t result in symptoms during their lifetimes. These symptom-free tumors are considered overdiagnoses — identification of cancer not likely to cause poor health or to present a risk to the man’s life.

A number of major professional organizations and government agencies have weighed in on the benefits and risks of PSA testing. The American Cancer Society, the American Urological Association, the American College of Preventive Medicine, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force all recognize the controversy surrounding screening with the PSA test and the lack of firm evidence that screening can prevent deaths from prostate cancer. Other points of agreement include:

  • Screening needs to be an individualized decision. All of the organizations recommend that doctors discuss the benefits and risks of PSA testing with men at a certain age or in high-risk groups. Doctors should help men make their own decisions about screening, based on age, risk factors, life expectancy and personal preferences.
  • Older men may not need to be screened. Some organizations recommend that screening isn’t necessary for men age 75 and older or those who aren’t expected to live more than 10 years. The American Cancer Society advises that this decision should be made on an individual basis. It is very important, however, to keep in mind that decisions need to be individualized and not assume that all prostate cancer screening must stop once a man is in his 70s.
  • Men at high risk should discuss screening at an earlier age. Some groups recommend earlier discussions for men in high-risk groups — those with a family history of prostate cancer and African-American men.

The American Cancer Society recommends that doctors provide information about prostate cancer screening to men at average risk starting at age 50, while men at higher risk could benefit from this information at age 40 or 45. The American Urological Association recommends that men consider getting a baseline prostate cancer screening, including a PSA test and DRE, beginning at age 40.

The American Urological Association (AUA) recommends against PSA screening in men under age 40, and it doesn’t recommend screening between ages 40 and 54 for men at average risk. For men ages 55 to 69, the AUA recommends shared decision-making between men and their doctors about when to begin screening. The AUA guidelines state that the greatest benefit of screening appears to be in men ages 55 to 69, and it does not recommend routine screening beyond age 70.

The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommends against PSA-based screening for men who do not have symptoms that are highly suspicious for prostate cancer. The USPSTF states that PSA testing in healthy men, regardless of age, offers no net benefit or that the harms outweigh the benefits. This has been a very controversial point of view, and many experts in the field of prostate cancer do not agree with the USPSTF recommendations.

http://www.vanderbilthealth.com/urology/42014

We went with just the blood work for the findings rather than the full biopsy.  While they were screening for this they also ran a screen for pancretic, liver and kidney.

By doing just the bloodwork first it is less evasive and the patient really does not have quite the anxiety that they do with the biopsy.

Hope this was informative.

Part three will be next week of the Melanoma treatment in Nashville and Vanderbilt Hospital. http://www.vanderbilthealth.com/main/maps

Till then eat healthy and appreciate your loved ones.

Tammye Honey


9 Comments

Life in Green Acres


Since June our lives have been in a small tornado of whirls here and there.  Mostly we have been to various doctors offices to spend our days with appointments.

It took from June till December for hubby to get cleared for a double hernia operation and a blockage in the private area.  Would have been November but he took ibuprofen not knowing that it is the same as aspirin.  So December it was, just a few days prior to Christmas.

He sat on ice packs and followed the doctor’s orders and was semi mending fine.  On to next doctor.

In January he had part of the inside of his mouth removed by the lower lip and chin area.  A few stitches that he called a caterpillar on the top of his lip and we were told that we were doing good.   It had been pre-cancer cells and that it was good that he had come in to have it done.

The day that we went to have his stitches removed it felt like the world had just been swirled around in a circle for us.

1503856_10202025836020587_988885660_n 1607106_10202025836980611_1399762810_n

It was the first time I have ever seen tears come to my husbands eyes in a doctor’s office as they called me into the exam room.

The doctor told us that the results showed sun or radiation damage and that he was looking at stage 3 cancer.

Now the appointments are being made to travel on a regular basis to Nashville TN where we will be seeing specialists at Vanderbilt Hospital.

I have the crying down to just in my sleep now so life is better.

Where we go from here is totally in Gods hands and lots of prayers.  The doctors there are some of the best in the nation.

Trying to blog or do anything right now is an effort.  I know that I must push on and be strong.

I am grateful for wonderful and comforting friends who are supportive through this and we both have wonderful family who are with us through all of it.

With time and prayer we will concur this and life will get better.  I have the faith.

Lessons learned…

Love your spouse each day and appreciate that they are here.

Do not take any form of aspirin or ibuprofen if you are due to have surgery for a month prior.

Smile and enjoy what life gives you.

Till our next appointment,

Tammye Honey


16 Comments

Daily Prompt: Taking Care Of Business


Daily Prompt: Take Care

When you’re unwell, do you allow others to take care of you, or do you prefer to soldier on alone?
What does it take for you to ask for help?

Photographers, artists, poets: show us HELP.

When I had my gallbladder out, my hubby went into the hospital right about the same time.
I broke two fingers on Saturday, (which is gong to make this blog shorter than normal).
My hubby is in bed sick and I have to drag him to the emergency room while I am getting a mammogram done today.

I am now driving myself to the dr. office for my blood work (Fasting) prior to my test today.

Soldier up is the way it goes…

Here are what other early morning Daily Prompt Writers had to say:

  1. Listen to Your Own Body | Daily Prompt: Take Care | likereadingontrains
  2. Depression | From Five to Fifty
  3. Sick day | Geek Ergo Sum
  4. That Time I Got Hit By a Car in Bangkok | Paths Unwritten
  5. Take Care | Musings from a practical mystic
  6. Take My Hand | It’s a wonderful F’N life
  7. Loads of tea | Spunky Wayfarer
  8. S.O.S. | Misifusa’s Blog
  9. Get up, get dressed and go in. And if you still feel unwell later, call me. | thoughtsofrkh
  10. Take Care: Unwell but not Undefeated | Mary Angelini Photography
  11. Daily Prompt: Take Care | iChristian

Hopefully this place that I am going to have the mammogram has the new technology so I won’t be hurting in two places.

So my question to my readers is do you get pampered when you are sick or do you carry on…

Tammye Honey


11 Comments

Daily Prompt: Popping A Pill Instead Of Eating?


Daily Prompt: Red Pill, Blue Pill

If you could get all the nutrition you needed in a day with a pill — no worrying about what to eat, no food preparation — would you do it?

Photographers, artists, poets: show us NOURISHMENT.

I have days where this would absolutely be ideal.  It would grow tiresome though as I do love to cook.
I love spending time in my kitchen and the food preparation  is partially what it is all about.
If I popped a pill that would mean that there would never be any more food videos.

That would make me sad.






I did not realize that I had made six videos already till I went to put them on here.

I have actually been tempted to make another one lately.
I just have not found the recipe that sparks me to do it.

What recipe would you like to see made so that you would learn how to make it fast and easily?

Perhaps your responses will spark my next video…all comments will be considered.

If you have a favorite recipe that you would like to be made into a video just send it to my email.

Here are the responses that other Daily Prompt Writers had today about the little pill of nutrition:

  1. Daily Prompt: Red Pill, Blue Pill | Basically Beyond Basic
  2. Free Your Stomach, and the Rest Will Follow | Do Not Get Sick in the Sink, Please
  3. What’s for dinner – Red pill or Blue Pill | Nanuschka’s Blog
  4. So sad! | Vivir, que no es poco
  5. Things That Pill Could Never Supply You With | Daily Prompt: Red Pill, Blue Pill | likereadingontrains
  6. dining with you, a haiku | charlottesville winter
  7. Pills | Cat’s Chinwag
  8. I’d swallow it. Especially if it just shut my selves up. | thoughtsofrkh
  9. Popping Pills | Hope* the happy hugger
  10. Time to eat! | Penne 4 Your Thoughts
  11. The Pill | Matthew Vett’s Development Blog

Since it is just 8 AM here Central Time, be sure to check back with Michelle during the day to see other Daily Prompt responses,.

Tammye Honey


2 Comments

Bad Experiences With Side Effects Of An Allergy


Simply walking into a room and taking a few pretzels from a bowl to eat.  
Adding mascara to my eyes.
That is all that it took.  

Inhaler, allergy meds, they did not help.  A small amount of relief but not totally.  I did not want to do the epi pen.

When do you decide enough is enough and give in and see a doctor?

Left eye swollen to the point where it was almost shut.
Itching across the abdomen.  
This all started on Saturday.

By Monday, with no signs of improvement, the doctor was called.

Feeling like I was being dragged behind the truck, I went in to the doctor’s office to get a shot.  Now I had pain in two places.  His suggestion was to place a hot pack on my eye to reduce the swelling so I could at least see out of it.  I had been doing ice packs prior as a home remedy.

I came home, took a new Dish towel that I had just washed and dried and attempted to sew up all the sides, leaving a small opening on one end.  I turned it right side out and proceeded to fill it with long grain rice.  I then sewed up the opening and placed it in the microwave for four minutes.  

From there I headed to bed.  My hubby was amazed that this little project worked.  

It is wonderful.  It was something that I had at home.  I did not have to stop anywhere to make a purchase.  It was quick and easy to make on my sewing machine and I had instant relief.  

The trick is to not over fill the bag or it will burst.  Do not heat over four minutes in the microwave or you will burn yourself.  

heating pad

 

For more information about corn allergies here is some insight:  http://tammyeandhubby.wordpress.com/about-corn-allergies/ and also at http://tammyeandhubby.wordpress.com/about-corn-allergies/how-to-rule-out-an-allergy-to-a-food/

If this information can help even one other person from having to go through the week I have had, it is well worth sharing.

Benadryl has Corn Syrup in the liquid or Corn Starch in the capsules so before you reach for that for relief…read the information.

My best to all.

Tammye Honey


10 Comments

Sharing PTSD Thoughts


12

 

About PTSD

http://comfortablynumb7.wordpress.com/more-about-ptsd/

English: signs and symptoms ptsdEnglish: signs and symptoms ptsd (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

PTSD: Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is an anxiety disorder caused by very stressful, frightening or distressing events.

The type of events that can cause PTSD include:
military combat
serious road accidents
terrorist attacks
natural disasters, such as severe floods, earthquakes or tsunamis
being held hostage
witnessing violent deaths
violent personal assaults, such as sexual assault, mugging or robbery

PTSD can develop immediately after someone experiences a disturbing event or it can occur weeks, months or even years later. It can develop in any situation where a person feels extreme fear, horror or helplessness. However, it doesn’t usually develop after situations that are simply upsetting, such as divorce, job loss or failing exams.

Signs & Symptoms of PTSD
Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) can be difficult to diagnose because people who experience traumatic events often don’t want to talk about their feelings. Also, people with PTSD may not seek treatment for many months or years after their symptoms appear.

The symptoms of PTSD usually develop during the first month after a person witnesses a traumatic event. However, in a minority of cases (less than 15%), there may be a delay of months or even years before symptoms start to appear. Some people experience long periods when their symptoms are less noticeable. This is known as symptom remission. These periods are often followed by an increase in symptoms. Other people with PTSD have severe symptoms that are constant.

Someone with PTSD will often relive the traumatic event through nightmares and flashbacks, and they may experience feelings of isolation, irritability and guilt. They may also have problems sleeping, such as insomnia, and find concentrating difficult. These symptoms are often severe and persistent enough to have asignificant impact on the person’s day-to-day life

Up to 30% of people who witness a traumatic event then go on to experience some of the symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). These symptoms can vary widely between individuals.
Re-experiencing- Re-experiencing is the most typical symptom of PTSD: A person will involuntarily and vividly relive the traumatic event in the form of flashbacks, nightmares or repetitive and distressing images or sensations. Being reminded of the traumatic event can evoke distressing memories and cause considerable anguish.

Avoidance: Trying to avoid being reminded of the traumatic event is another key symptom of PTSD. Reminders can take the form of people, situations or circumstances that resemble or are associated with the event. Many people with PTSD will try to push memories of the event out of their mind. They do not like thinking or talking about the event in detail. Some people repeatedly ask themselves questions that prevent them from coming to terms with the event. For example, they may wonder why the event happened to them and whether it could have been prevented.

Hyperarousal (feeling ‘on edge’): Someone with PTSD may be very anxious and find it difficult to relax. They may be constantly aware of threats and easily startled. This state of mind is known as hyperarousal. Irritability, angry outbursts, sleeping problems and difficulty concentrating are also common.

Emotional numbing: Some people with PTSD deal with their feelings by trying not to feel anything at all. This is known as emotional numbing. They may feel detached or isolated from others, or guilty. Someone with PTSD can often seem deep in thought and withdrawn. They may also give up pursuing the activities that they used to enjoy.

Other possible signs & symptoms of PTSD include:
depression, anxiety and phobias
drug misuse or alcohol misuse
sweating, shaking, headaches, dizziness, chest pains and stomach upsets
having vivid memories, flashbacks or nightmares about the event
trying to avoid things that remind you of the event
sometimes feeling emotionally numb
often feeling irritable and anxious for no apparent reason
eating more than usual, or drinking alcohol or using drugs more than usual
an inability to control your mood
finding it increasingly difficult to get on with others
having to keep yourself very busy to cope
feeling depressed or exhausted

PTSD sometimes leads to the breakdown of relationships and causes work-related problems.
Treating PTSD
PTSD can be successfully treated, even when it develops many years after a traumatic event.
Any treatment depends on the severity of symptoms and how soon they occur after the traumatic event. The following treatment options may be recommended:
watchful waiting: waiting to see whether the symptoms improve or get worse without treatment
psychological treatment: such as trauma-focused cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) or eye movement desensitisation and reprocessing (EDMR)
medication: such as paroxetine or mirtazapine

***For the record my husband has not been officially diagnosed with PTSD but with the many signs and symptoms he is showing (in bold italics) along with an abusive past, we (him,our initial counsellor and myself) feel that this what he is going through and the route we are exploring with deeper therapy at this time***

I have discovered there is also a link between PTSD and addiction – drink/drugs/gambling/porn etc, 2 of which are relevant to my husband.

Related Articles

This is real and a part of just about every Veteran who has served in a few tours overseas.  The problem is that the medication only treats part of the problem.  The remainder of the problem is still there and still very real.  It is something that each Veteran lives with and their families every day.

May this bring some attention to the problem and possibly help to stop cutting the benefits that they deserve to get the help they need.

Tammye Honey.


13 Comments

Daily Prompt: Going List-Y


Daily Prompt: The Satisfaction of a List

Who doesn’t love a list? So write one! Top five slices of pizza in your town, ten reasons disco will never die, the three secrets to happiness — go silly or go deep, just go list-y.

lists

Why do we make lists?  What type of lists do we make?  Are they to keep us organized, help us to remember or just something to doodle when in a meeting?

I decided to explore the different types of lists that people make.  Here are my findings.

The Ever Famous Summer Bucket List…(Kids are out of school for break, have limited time to get it done in short time)

bucket list

 

Then I began to think about what do we use list for besides…

wine list on menu

 

Menus in Restaurants

top ten spices eating right listReading articles

schedule

Making Appointments

party guest list

Having a party or wedding

notebook lists

Taking notes or inventory

cleaning list

Cleaning Lists

wish

Hmmm

store joke

grocery

We make this so we do not impulse shop

do it

Ah the Honey Do List…

list

Now it is time for me to make my list like the prompt said…

I need to decide which list to start with first…
Perhaps I need a list for my lists
Should they all be neatly lined on the fridge?
Do I line them up by importance?
What deems the list more important?
My fridge has a Honey Do and Grocery…
Both are forgotten by hubby…
If I could eat in a corn free restaurant, I would love a menu
I don’t drink, so I do not need a wine list.
I am a little old to start a bucket list
Today is day off from A-Z Challenge
Tomorrow I do the Letter M
That really is a list of sorts, yet broken down by day
It does not feel like a list that is in a list.
I guess you could easily say that my lists have lists.

Here are what some other Daily Prompt Writers had to say:

  1. Poem by Caro Ness dedicated to my Blog | Inside My Glitching Mind
  2. List ‘em up! | amateurxpress
  3. 10+1 reasons why alarm clocks aren’t good for you | MC’s Whispers
  4. Daily Prompt: The Satisfaction of a List | Taking time, making time
  5. Eating silkworms, MasterChef Korea, and the satisfaction of making a list. | Nomad
  6. A Partial List Of Reasons Why I Don’t Make Lists | The Jittery Goat
  7. “Write Blog Post”-Check! « Sorta-Ginger
  8. Daily Prompt: The Satisfaction of a List | Dianaruth’s Journal
  9. Top 10 Things You Won’t Hear Around This House | Sam’s Online Journal
  10. Funny Things About the Human Body | Conversations
  11. Daily Post: Lists | A Sign Of Life
  12. Daily Prompt: The Satisfaction of a List « Mama Bear Musings
  13. Daily Prompt: The Satisfaction of a List | Why donate blood | LinnettG’s blog
  14. Top 6 Cute Baby C Things | Stuphblog
  15. Ten Irish quirks (Daily Prompt) | Ireland, MS and me
  16. Daily Prompt: The List | Cytherean Dreams
  17. Satisfy the list. | thoughtsofrkh
  18. Daily Prompt: The Satisfaction of a List 14th April 2013 | ittikorn1994
  19. List-tacular! Some of The Greatest Lessons I’ve Learned. | Eyes Through The Glass – A Blog About Asperger’s
  20. Listing The Movies… | That’s so true!
  21. My Top 5 Underknown Historical Figures | Matthew Vett’s Development Blog
  22. May I tell you about love « Completely Disappear
  23. Getting Your Writing Organized | Sandra Harriette’s Blog
  24. Lists… | Faith, Hope and Chocolate
  25. The satisfaction of a list | Epi’s epiphanies

To see more click on the link at the top that is Michelle

What is your list like and why?  I would love to hear…leave me a comment please.

Tammye Honey


Leave a comment

Thank You Dr. Oz & Dr. Phil


While I am in the midst of reading all of my fellow Word Press Writer’s Blogs for today I am heavily bombarded by pop ups from either Dr. Oz or Dr. Phil.

They are both advising me on how to lose weight by burning my excess fat.

http://doctoroz.sharecare.com/

http://www.drphil.com/

Now that I am about 120 lbs. at 5′ 8″ I am 10 lbs. under weight.

Where were you when I weighed 185 lbs. and could have used your advice?  Oh, that is right, you were not rich and famous yet.  I had to do it the hard way.

Eating right, changing my diet, exercising, working several jobs at a time, being a single mom, taking care of two daughters….

Sorry that I just do not appreciate your pop up ads right now.  I am sure that you mean well.  Even when I answered your survey,  hoping to find a way to be healthy while I maintain my weight or slowly gain a few pounds to get to my optimum weight, I received numerous emails from both of you urging me to lose more weight and purchase food products to do so.  To purchase your books and diet plans to lose even more weight against the advice of my physician.

Who am I going to listen to?  Two famous TV doctors?  Guess again…

I am taking the advice of my own family physician who reads my blood tests and sees my x-rays on a regular basis.  She is the one who knows what my prescriptions are, my blood pressure is and has been the one to give me all of my physicals.

Thank you as you might help a few people who really need you and do not have a family physician.  I feel that is the first place anyone who does have their own physician should start.  With someone who knows their body.  Not with a system who does not know what makes them tick inside.

Have a nice day,

What do you feel about this as readers?  Does this happen to you or am I just a lucky one?

Would love to hear from you and your opinion on this matter.

Tammye Honey


2 Comments

Daily Prompt: Happily Ever After Without Migraines


Daily Prompt: Happily Ever After

by michelle w. on February 26, 2013

“And they lived happily ever after.” Think about this line for a few minutes. Are you living happily ever after? If not, what will it take for you to get there?

I have a happy life.  Good Marriage, Great Animals, yet my migraines take me out of circulation for several days.  I have medication that I take daily to try and prevent them (When I remember to take them)… if I have forgotten, the migraines come into the picture and I know it.  I can’t eat, can not tolerate light, sound or even smells.

Between eating foods that I should not and forgetting my medications…I know it is coming…the migraine medication itself works quickly like the package states, however…I am out like a light for days.

Other than to get up and stumble around to feed the animals and let them out to do their duty, I am hid in a dark room with no light.

Having a bucket by the bed is a necessity.  Less clean up when I smell something or if I move too quickly.

If you have ever suffered from a migraine or know someone who has then you know what I am saying here.  It is not a pretty sight.

Crawling back out after a series of three days to see the house and what I have missed in cleaning ugh…

Time to play catch up in more than just my blogs…

Have a great day…

Here are what other Daily Prompt Writers Had to say on it…

  1. Where’s your ambition? | Right Down My Alley
  2. Ilya Fostiy. Prophetic Dream | Philosophy & Photography
  3. Yes I am… Maybe. «Natalie Elizabeth Beech Natalie Elizabeth Beech
  4. Daily Prompt: Happily Ever After | Loading…
  5. Daily Post: Happily Ever After | tel-uh-vizh-uh-ner-ee
  6. On Happy Endings | Never Stationary
  7. The cake is a lie | The Nameless One
  8. Ones upon a time. | ayimas
  9. Right now… | Hope* the happy hugger
  10. Fairytales | Spunky Wayfarer
  11. Fairy Tales | Spunky Wayfarer
  12. Daily Promp: Happily Ever After | LooknWalk
  13. And they all lived happily ever after… | AnxiousElephant
  14. Happily Ever After | Misifusa’s Blog
  15. Happily Ever After? | Stuphblog
  16. Daily Prompt: Happily Ever After | Joe’s Musings
  17. Happily Ever After | das Nicht-zuhause-sein
  18. Letting Go of Stuff | The Daily Dilly Dally
  19. Daily Prompt: Happily Ever After | Completely Disappear
  20. To Be Happily Ever After You Must Be Happily Ever Before. | The Jittery Goat


6 Comments

Daily Prompt: Live to Eat|


Daily Prompt: Live to Eat

by michelle w. on December 21, 2012

Some people eat to live, while others live to eat. What about you? How far would you travel for the best meal of your life?

It is sad to say that I only travel as far as my kitchen for my meals.  Since the meals that I eat have to be recreated around my dietary needs and around my corn allergy it is difficult to eat out.

Often Used Business Cards

Often Used Business Cards

Power Strip

Power Strip

Calendar and Items Clipped

Calendar and Items Clipped

Towel Holders

Towel Holders

Vintage Medium Lid Holders

Vintage Medium Lid Holders

Aprons out of traffic

Aprons out of traffic

Rather than reach under a cupboard

Rather than reach under a cupboard

Instead of painting

Instead of painting

Recycle Bag Dispenser

Recycle Bag Dispenser

Roll Around Petition

Roll Around Petition

Roll around Rack

Roll around Rack

Tupperware Lid Holders

Tupperware Lid Holders

Spice Rack

Spice Rack

Mounted Cups Behind Microwave

Mounted Cups Behind Microwave

Took around kitchen

Took around kitchen

Easy mount and molding

Easy mount and molding

Goodwill Photos

Home Sweet Home

CIMG0069Making my own recipes I am certain what is actually in the food each time and I am not running for the Epi Pen.

Getting Recipes from the web and from various magazines such as Bon Appetite Magazine, Family Circle Magazine I can make great food at home and just modify the ingredients to meet my needs.

Changing Corn starch to Rice Starch or Potato Starch is a simple and healthy trade.

Changing regular flour to Gluten Free Flour is a simple and easy trade out that is healthy and easy.

CIMG1382CIMG1463CIMG2279Not only do we eat healthy, we are able to eat what we want, we save money on car gas and on restaurant costs as well.

Don’t forget to read my fellow bloggers insights on this also:

  1. Hyped up food [Daily Prompt] « Q the Adult
  2. Daily Prompt: Live to Eat | A Hedonistic Wander
  3. Daily Prompt: Live to Eat | Stuph Blog
  4. Eat to Live then to Eat | Phelio a Random Post a Day
  5. Living and eating … « Hope* the happy hugger
  6. Daily Prompt: Live to Eat | Pigments of Life
  7. Daily Prompt: Live to Eat « prettywitgla33es
  8. TDP: Soul Food | jrwritesthings
  9. Toast to Apples | Shadoza: In My World
  10. http://dailypost.wordpress.com/2012/12/21/daily-post-live-eat/