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Writing 101: Day 5 A Brief Encounter (Part II of A Part III Series of Day 4)


writing-101-june-2014-class-badge-2You discover a letter on a path that affects you deeply. Today, write about this encounter. And your twist? Be as succinct as possible.

The letter read that he had left because of his PTSD.  He knew how much his crying out at night was upsetting her and he did not want to hurt her any more.
He loved her with all of his heart and owed her every thing.  He did not feel it was fair to make her suffer the way that he did each night in his mind as he relived his war days.
As I turned the envelope over I could see drops of tears on the front with slight drips of mascara.

On the bottom, there was an impression of a kiss with a scribbled note that said I will find you.


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Daily Prompt: Connecting the Dots Each Day


Daily Prompt: Connect the Dots

Scour the news for an entirely uninteresting story.
Consider how it connects to your life.
Write about that.

Photographers, artists, poets: show us a CONNECTION.

I am going to state ahead of time that I will possible ruffle a few feathers with this article.  
This is fine since comments are welcome of all opinions.

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I chose to write about PTSD and it’s effects on lives of the family members of those who have it.
It is not just the person who has it who suffers from this.  The research is so in the dark for a cure.

Despite being told by a psychiatrist not to watch the Military Channel someone with PTSD can be drawn to it like flys to honey.

The path to recover is a long and slow path with a lot of work for the individual and the family.

Patience is the key.  Some days it feels as if alzheimer’s disease has kicked in or a bad case of “deja vous”  as the day progresses the little triggers kick in.

Night time is worse in our home and the dream medication will work some nights and other nights it is as if it were never taken.  Not only does the person relive the encounter, the spouse also spends the evening having the same experience.  This makes for a very long night and very little restful sleep.  

To put the day back into prospective the next morning is always very interesting.  Bringing the subject back to the current day (which I have done throughout the night at times also) is sometimes easier after a cup of coffee.  

My prayer is that they find a real cure for it rather than give a combination of pills that work as a “cocktail”.
I have found my spouse on the floor from these wonderful combinations as the sudden drop in blood pressure causes the body to drop where the subject is.  

This is dangerous.  After playing russian roulette with the various medications, being off from the majority of them has been the only answer.

Hense, the suffering continues.  The good news is that only the family is the ones who are suffering since the subject really does not realize what is happening most of the time.
Going to a grocery store and trying to go down an isle does not seem like a big deal unless you are a person with PTSD.  The problem is that the family sometimes forgets this and turns to find the subject missing.  They are left standing in the isle talking to themself as they turn to find the subject has disappeared.  Frustration has just set in for everyone.  Both the subject who has had an episode and the family member who now has to stop and begin a quest to find the subject.  What started out as a simple few object shopping list trip has now become a few hours.  
There are other days that the trip goes very smoothly and rapidly as one would normally plan and life is awesome.  The amazing part of PTSD is that there are no pre indicators.  It is not like a migraine where you get the warning signs.  

My answer to it all is simply…Tomorrow is truly another day.

Would love to hear from my readers about how you feel about this.  
Leave a comment and let me know.

Tammye Honey

 

 


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Sharing PTSD Thoughts


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About PTSD

http://comfortablynumb7.wordpress.com/more-about-ptsd/

English: signs and symptoms ptsdEnglish: signs and symptoms ptsd (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

PTSD: Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is an anxiety disorder caused by very stressful, frightening or distressing events.

The type of events that can cause PTSD include:
military combat
serious road accidents
terrorist attacks
natural disasters, such as severe floods, earthquakes or tsunamis
being held hostage
witnessing violent deaths
violent personal assaults, such as sexual assault, mugging or robbery

PTSD can develop immediately after someone experiences a disturbing event or it can occur weeks, months or even years later. It can develop in any situation where a person feels extreme fear, horror or helplessness. However, it doesn’t usually develop after situations that are simply upsetting, such as divorce, job loss or failing exams.

Signs & Symptoms of PTSD
Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) can be difficult to diagnose because people who experience traumatic events often don’t want to talk about their feelings. Also, people with PTSD may not seek treatment for many months or years after their symptoms appear.

The symptoms of PTSD usually develop during the first month after a person witnesses a traumatic event. However, in a minority of cases (less than 15%), there may be a delay of months or even years before symptoms start to appear. Some people experience long periods when their symptoms are less noticeable. This is known as symptom remission. These periods are often followed by an increase in symptoms. Other people with PTSD have severe symptoms that are constant.

Someone with PTSD will often relive the traumatic event through nightmares and flashbacks, and they may experience feelings of isolation, irritability and guilt. They may also have problems sleeping, such as insomnia, and find concentrating difficult. These symptoms are often severe and persistent enough to have asignificant impact on the person’s day-to-day life

Up to 30% of people who witness a traumatic event then go on to experience some of the symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). These symptoms can vary widely between individuals.
Re-experiencing- Re-experiencing is the most typical symptom of PTSD: A person will involuntarily and vividly relive the traumatic event in the form of flashbacks, nightmares or repetitive and distressing images or sensations. Being reminded of the traumatic event can evoke distressing memories and cause considerable anguish.

Avoidance: Trying to avoid being reminded of the traumatic event is another key symptom of PTSD. Reminders can take the form of people, situations or circumstances that resemble or are associated with the event. Many people with PTSD will try to push memories of the event out of their mind. They do not like thinking or talking about the event in detail. Some people repeatedly ask themselves questions that prevent them from coming to terms with the event. For example, they may wonder why the event happened to them and whether it could have been prevented.

Hyperarousal (feeling ‘on edge’): Someone with PTSD may be very anxious and find it difficult to relax. They may be constantly aware of threats and easily startled. This state of mind is known as hyperarousal. Irritability, angry outbursts, sleeping problems and difficulty concentrating are also common.

Emotional numbing: Some people with PTSD deal with their feelings by trying not to feel anything at all. This is known as emotional numbing. They may feel detached or isolated from others, or guilty. Someone with PTSD can often seem deep in thought and withdrawn. They may also give up pursuing the activities that they used to enjoy.

Other possible signs & symptoms of PTSD include:
depression, anxiety and phobias
drug misuse or alcohol misuse
sweating, shaking, headaches, dizziness, chest pains and stomach upsets
having vivid memories, flashbacks or nightmares about the event
trying to avoid things that remind you of the event
sometimes feeling emotionally numb
often feeling irritable and anxious for no apparent reason
eating more than usual, or drinking alcohol or using drugs more than usual
an inability to control your mood
finding it increasingly difficult to get on with others
having to keep yourself very busy to cope
feeling depressed or exhausted

PTSD sometimes leads to the breakdown of relationships and causes work-related problems.
Treating PTSD
PTSD can be successfully treated, even when it develops many years after a traumatic event.
Any treatment depends on the severity of symptoms and how soon they occur after the traumatic event. The following treatment options may be recommended:
watchful waiting: waiting to see whether the symptoms improve or get worse without treatment
psychological treatment: such as trauma-focused cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) or eye movement desensitisation and reprocessing (EDMR)
medication: such as paroxetine or mirtazapine

***For the record my husband has not been officially diagnosed with PTSD but with the many signs and symptoms he is showing (in bold italics) along with an abusive past, we (him,our initial counsellor and myself) feel that this what he is going through and the route we are exploring with deeper therapy at this time***

I have discovered there is also a link between PTSD and addiction – drink/drugs/gambling/porn etc, 2 of which are relevant to my husband.

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This is real and a part of just about every Veteran who has served in a few tours overseas.  The problem is that the medication only treats part of the problem.  The remainder of the problem is still there and still very real.  It is something that each Veteran lives with and their families every day.

May this bring some attention to the problem and possibly help to stop cutting the benefits that they deserve to get the help they need.

Tammye Honey.