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Findings Along The Way Part III

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We have been busy through the Easter Holiday Season and Happy Holidays to all of our friends.  If you are celebrating Shabbat I realize that you might not be reading this yet but hope that your Holiday is blessed.

Our blood work did not come back and actually had to be retaken.  They had not ran the actual test for the various types of cancer.

Ultimately, that meant another week of waiting.  Just as we were able to get the results back we were back to the surgeon the same day after a call from our doctor that morning to confirm that there was no Prostate, Pancreatic, liver or kidney either.  What puzzled both doctors what that if he had been diagnosed with stage 3 that it should have not been dormant and should have shown also in one of those tests.

The big day arrived and we went off to Vanderbilt to see the specialist there.  What a great place.
Talk about fast.  We were in to see the doctor before his son could park and catch up to us.
I had left instructions that his son would be joining us so that when he came in they sent him right in with us.

This doctor was thorough and checked the entire site.  She even marked him for surgery.
She listened to his concerns and questions and answered them as well as mine and his sons.
She announced that it was stage 1 and was just in the first layer of skin.

Squamous cell carcinoma

Squamous cell carcinoma, although more aggressive than basal cell carcinoma, is highly treatable. It accounts for about 20 percent of all skin cancers. Squamous cell carcinoma may appear as nodules or red, scaly patches of skin, and may be found on sun-exposed areas such as the face, ears, lips, and mouth. However, if left untreated, squamous cell carcinoma can spread to other parts of the body. This type of skin cancer is usually found in fair-skinned people.

– See more at: http://www.vanderbilthealth.com/includes/healthtopics/article.php?ContentTypeId=85&ContentId=P00724&Category=SearchAZ&SubtopicId=30914&lang=en&section=33113&term=s&searchType=az&fullText=#sthash.QagRMMAa.dpuf

It was not what we had dreaded and we will be going on April 30th to have it removed.

Some other great findings along the way:

Am I At Risk for Soft Tissue Sarcoma?

 

radiation

Being exposed to radiation, such as having it as part of treatment for breast or cervical cancer, can increase your risk for soft tissue sarcoma.

 

There is really no way to know for sure if you’re going to get soft tissue sarcoma. Most people who get this type of cancer have no risk factors. Remember, just because you have one or more risk factors doesn’t necessarily mean you will get soft tissue sarcoma. In fact, most people do not. You can have all the risk factors and still not get soft tissue sarcoma, or you can have no known risk factors and still get it.

While the majority of people who get soft tissue sarcomas have no known risk factors, certain things can make one person more likely to get a soft tissue sarcoma than another person. These are the known risk factors for soft tissue sarcoma.

People who have had high-dose radiation to treat other cancers, such as breast or cervical cancer, have a slightly higher risk of developing a soft tissue sarcoma. In general, routine X-rays and diagnostic tests do not put people at a higher risk of soft tissue sarcoma.

Chronic lymphedema (where fluid collects in the tissue and causes swelling) after radiation to lymph nodes, or surgical removal of lymph nodes is also a risk factor.

People who have worked with or have been around certain chemicals may be at greater risk of developing soft tissue sarcoma. It is not known for certain, but it is thought that high exposure to herbicides, as well as the chemical dioxin and chlorophenols, may increase the risk.

If someone in your family has certain diseases, you may be more at risk for developing a soft tissue sarcoma. If you have many family members who have had sarcoma or other cancers at a young age, ask your health care provider about genetic testing to see if you are at greater risk for developing a sarcoma. You may have inherited a gene that is defective if anyone in your family had one of these diseases:

  • Neurofibromatosis. This disease runs in families. In this disease, noncancerous tumors form in the nerves under the skin and in other parts of the body. About 5% of people with these tumors get malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (cancer in nerve coverings).
  • Li-Fraumeni syndrome. This disease runs in families. It increases a person’s chance of getting breast cancer, brain tumors, leukemias, and sarcomas.
  • Retinoblastoma. This eye cancer, found in children, may run in families. Children who have been cured of this form of eye cancer may be at a slightly greater risk of developing soft tissue sarcomas later in life.

In the past, people believed that injuries to muscles or other tissues made a person more likely to get soft tissue sarcoma. This is not true. Injury is not a risk factor for soft tissue sarcoma.

– See more at: http://www.vanderbilthealth.com/includes/healthtopics/article.php?ContentTypeId=34&ContentId=17556-1&Category=SearchTitle&SubtopicId=30914&lang=en&section=30914&term=removal%20of%20skin%20tissue&searchType=title&fullText=removal%20of%20skin%20tissue&searchLoc=global#sthash.UFebc3LY.dpuf

Melanomas vary greatly in appearance. Some melanomas may show all of the ABCD characteristics, while others may show few or none. Always consult your doctor for a diagnosis.

Skin cancer is more common in fair-skinned people, especially those with blond or red hair, who have light-colored eyes. Skin cancer is rare in children. However, no one is safe from skin cancer. Other risk factors include:

  • Family history of melanoma
  • Personal history of skin cancer
  • Sun exposure. The amount of time spent unprotected in the sun directly affects your risk of skin cancer.
  • Early childhood sunburns. Research has shown that sunburns early in life increase a person’s risk for skin cancer later in life.
  • Many freckles
  • Large or many ordinary moles
  • Dysplastic nevi
  • Male gender
  • An immunosuppressive disorder or weakened immune system (such as in people who have had organ transplants)
  • Exposure to certain chemicals, like arsenic
  • Radiation exposure
  • Smoking
  • HPV (human papillomavirus)
  • Certain rare inherited conditions, such as basal cell nevus syndrome (Gorlin syndrome), or xeroderma pigmentosum (XP)

The American Academy of Dermatology (AAD) recommends the following steps to help reduce your risk of skin cancer:

  • Wear protective clothing, including a long-sleeved shirt, pants, a wide-brimmed hat and sunglasses, when possible.
  • Seek the shade when appropriate, especially when the sun’s rays are the strongest, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
  • Regularly use a broad-spectrum sunscreen with an SPF (sun protection factor) of 30 or higher on all exposed skin, even on cloudy days. Sunscreen should be reapplied every two hours and after swimming or sweating.
  • Protect children from the sun by using shade, protective clothing, and applying sunscreen.
  • Use extra caution near water, snow, and sand, which can reflect the sun’s rays and increase the chances of sunburn.
  • Avoid tanning beds. The UV (ultraviolet) light from tanning beds can cause skin cancer and wrinkling.
  • Check your birthday suit on your birthday. Look at your skin carefully and if you see anything changing, growing, or bleeding on your skin, see your doctor.
  • Get vitamin D safely through a healthy diet (which may include vitamin supplements.) Don’t seek out the sun.

The American Academy of Pediatrics approves of the use of sunscreen on infants younger than 6 months old only if adequate clothing and shade are not available. Parents should still try to avoid sun exposure and dress the infant in lightweight clothing that covers most surface areas of skin. However, parents also may apply a minimal amount of sunscreen to the infant’s face and back of the hands.

Remember, sand and pavement reflect UV rays even under an umbrella. Snow is a particularly good reflector of UV rays.

Finding suspicious moles or skin cancer early is the key to treating skin cancer successfully. A skin self-exam is usually the first step in detecting skin cancer. The following suggested method of self-examination comes from the AAD:

(You will need a full-length mirror, a hand mirror, and a brightly lit room.)

  • Examine your body front and back in mirror, then the right and left sides, with your arms raised. Women should look under their breasts.
  • Bend your elbows, look carefully at your forearms, the back of your upper arms, and the palms of your hands. Check between your fingers and look at your nail beds.
  • Look at backs of your legs and feet, spaces between your toes, your toenail beds, and the soles of your feet.
  • Examine the back of your neck and scalp with a hand mirror.
  • Check your back, buttocks, and genital area with a hand mirror.
  • Become familiar with your skin and the pattern of your moles, freckles, and other marks.
  • Be alert to changes in the number, size, shape, and color of pigmented areas.
  • Follow the ABCD Chart when examining moles of other pigmented areas and consult your doctor promptly if you notice any changes.

Specific treatment for skin cancer will be determined by your doctor based on:

  • Your age, overall health, and medical history
  • Type of skin cancer
  • Extent and location of the disease
  • Your tolerance for specific medications, procedures, or therapies
  • Expectations for the course of the disease
  • Your opinion or preference

There are several kinds of treatments for skin cancer, including the following:

  • Surgery. Surgery is a common treatment for skin cancer. It is used in most treated cases. Some types of skin cancer growths can be removed very easily and require only very minor surgery, while others may require a more extensive surgical procedure. Surgery may include the following procedures:
    • Cryosurgery. Using liquid nitrogen, cryosurgery uses an instrument that sprays the liquid onto the skin, freezing and destroying the tissue.
    • Curettage and electrodesiccation. This common type of surgery involves scraping away skin tissue with a curette (a sharp surgical instrument), followed by cauterizing the wound with an electrosurgical unit.
    • Excision. A scalpel (sharp surgical instrument) may be used to excise (cut away) and remove the growth. The wound is usually stitched or held closed with skin clips.
    • Mohs’ microscopically controlled surgery. This type of surgery involves excising a lesion, layer by layer. Each piece of removed tissue is examined under a microscope. Tissue is progressively removed until no tumor cells are seen. The goal of this type of surgery is to remove all of the malignant cells and as little normal tissue as possible. It is often used with recurring tumors (those that come back after treatment).
  • Laser therapy. Laser surgery uses a narrow beam of light to destroy cancer cells, and is sometimes used with tumors located on the outer layer of skin.
  • Radiation therapy. X-rays are used to kill cancer cells and shrink tumors.
  • Photodynamic therapy. Photodynamic therapy uses a certain type of light and a special chemical to kill cancer cells.
  • Other types of treatment include the following:
    • Chemotherapy. Chemotherapy uses drugs to kill cancer cells.
      • Topical chemotherapy. Chemotherapy given as a cream or lotion placed on the skin to kill cancer cells.
      • Systemic chemotherapy. Chemotherapy administered orally or intravenously (IV) for more advanced cancers.
    • Immunotherapy. Immunotherapy involves various approaches to boost the body’s own immune system, helping it to attack the cancer. Some types of treatment can be applied on tumors or injected directly into them. Other types are used for more advanced cancers and are given as an injection into the vein (IV)
    • Targeted therapy. Some medicines used to treat advanced skin cancers work by targeting specific parts of the cancer cells. These medicines can often be taken as a pill.

– See more at: http://www.vanderbilthealth.com/includes/healthtopics/article.php?ContentTypeId=85&ContentId=P00724&Category=SearchAZ&SubtopicId=30914&lang=en&section=33113&term=s&searchType=az&fullText=#sthash.QagRMMAa.dpuf

Hope this helps anyone who has been following this blog.

I would love to hear your ideas and findings as well.

Tammye Honey

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Author: TammyeHoney

I am about Blogging various information. If you check, I have several sites. Everything from food to funny with a few product lines in between. I am a Daily Prompt Blogger and an A-Z prompt blogger as well. Thank you for checking out my site. I hope you enjoy. I started this for cooking and my corn allergy and then it grew...

2 thoughts on “Findings Along The Way Part III

  1. Good luck and thank you for all the information… Many blessing and love, Lor

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